Unispora serves to elevate marginalized voices within immigrant/refugee communities around the world.

Category Archives: United Kingdom

To the little girl with the plaits in her hair…

To the little girl with the plaits in her hair…
To the little girl with the plaits in her hair, Unispora- Samara's Family With her passport in hand and a jump in her step, you are about to see snow for the first time. Well, actually I mean sleet – that frustrating kind of precipitate stuck somewhere between...
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Complicated and Confident

Complicated and Confident
Complicated and Confident: What it’s like to Grow Up in the First Generation of Multicultural Madness The United States is truly unique in that it has such a beautiful selection of cultures from every corner of the world, all coming together to live in a new country for the prospect of opportunity and the delight of...
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“I’m Korean, but not really.”

“I’m Korean, but not really.”
1. Why did your family move to the U.S.? It was all part of the “American Dream”. My dad was one of those ambitious Asians that wanted to immigrate to a great country out there for a better living for himself and most importantly, his family. It took him years to figure out when exactly that...
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I had a very rich childhood…

I had a very rich childhood…
"I had a very rich childhood. I experienced Zimbabwe when the situation had not yet deteriorated. It was a safe environment and had a lot of open space. Currently, most of my childhood friends and family live abroad. A lot has changed but it’s still like a trip down memory lane."- Nyasha
  • Self Ethnic...
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Uganda

Uganda
When people find out all of the places I’ve lived, they always ask me where I think home is. I make a face and try answer them. I say it’s where my family is based at the moment but I also say that my ‘spiritual home’ is Uganda, where my black, African parents are from....
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I always felt slightly displaced in the UK…

I always felt slightly displaced in the UK…
I always felt slightly displaced in the UK, especially because my mom is white and my dad is black (African American). So being mixed race you kind of grow up colorblind. You don’t register it. You're just used to everyone around you. It’s only as you start to grow up that you realize, "My hair...
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I don’t think I had a … “normal” childhood…

I don’t think I had a … “normal” childhood…
(Image Source: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, http://global.unc.edu/news/gillings-school-of-global-public-health-researchers-win-fogarty-awards-to-promote-ethics-in-drc/ ) I don’t think I had a productive or "normal" childhood like every other kid. In Congo we had no TV so I was unable to watch cartoons or animated stuff. From a young age, I started doing housework and cooking for my brothers and my sisters children. So...
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Nigerian in Saudi Arabia

Nigerian in Saudi Arabia

Family Background: Nigeria

Born: Saudi Arabia

Raised: Saudi Arabia

Living: Studying in the UK

Languages: Arabic, Hausa, English

  • C: What is like when you go back to Nigeria?
  • B: It feels like home.
  • C: Is there one place that is home more than the other?
  • B: This one is difficult. Any place you go you feel like home and I know maybe you share the same feeling.
  • C: Did your parents speak Hausa at home in Saudi Arabia?
  • B: At home we speak Hausa and 80% of our community speak Hausa even those who are not Hausa speak Hausa. I remember they had to send a child back home because he couldn’t speak Hausa.
  • C: Why did your parents move?
  • B:I think it’s normally Islamic ideology. In Saudi Arabia there are two things that bring many people. First the religion, than the business. You have oil. That is attracting workers.
  • C: Do you have dual citizenship?
  • B: If your father is not a citizen you can’t be a citizen in Saudi Arabia. All these Arab countries they are like that.
  • C: If someone asked you where are you from what would you say?
  • B: Nigeria

- Bashir

Facebook: www.facebook.com/bash.kasim