Unispora serves to elevate marginalized voices within immigrant/refugee communities around the world.

Category Archives: United States

Complicated and Confident

Complicated and Confident
Complicated and Confident: What it’s like to Grow Up in the First Generation of Multicultural Madness The United States is truly unique in that it has such a beautiful selection of cultures from every corner of the world, all coming together to live in a new country for the prospect of opportunity and the delight of...
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“I am here and elsewhere”

“I am here and elsewhere”
In the in-betweens, the grey scales, the rope walker, that's where I find myself. Floating on the ocean of cultures, histories, languages, and two polar opposite governments. I am all and nothing. I am here and elsewhere. My identity, unlike my fingerprint, cannot be simply captured. Your narrow mindedness tries to make a check box out of me. To fit skin...
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“I’m Korean, but not really.”

“I’m Korean, but not really.”
1. Why did your family move to the U.S.? It was all part of the “American Dream”. My dad was one of those ambitious Asians that wanted to immigrate to a great country out there for a better living for himself and most importantly, his family. It took him years to figure out when exactly that...
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I look VERY Ghanaian…at least to me.

I look VERY Ghanaian…at least to me.

I’m never quite sure how to begin these personal narratives. It’s much like when someone asks me where I’m from and I respond Ghana only to have that person look at me blankly because,  “I don’t look or sound Ghanaian”. The idea that I don’t look Ghanaian always makes me laugh because I...

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“As a female Indian living in America…”

“As a female Indian living in America…”
  1. Why did your family move to the US? My parents moved to the US because they knew that there were more opportunities for them that being back home in India did not necessarily provide. Specifically, occupational.
  2. Tell me about your childhood. I was born and raised in America, but since my parents were the first generation from India...
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Invisibly In-Between

Invisibly In-Between
The sky began to darken as we commenced our journey to Reno, Nevada from Southern California. We were headed to our first Efik convention, one that would allow us to experience a slice of our Nigerian home and culture in The States. There were six of us in the rental mini van: Dad, Mom, my...
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Blind to the Beautiful Possibilities Within

Blind to the Beautiful Possibilities Within
I was born in Puerto Rico, but shortly thereafter my parents decided to move to Camden, New Jersey full of optimistic dreams and the search for greater opportunities for their children. I grew up in an underprivileged, poverty-stricken community and was forced to confront language barriers; both contributed to the many challenges I faced. I...
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My Middle Name

My Middle Name
During my trip to Kenya in 2009, one of the workers at the safari park asked me if I wanted to pet a cheetah, and naturally I agreed. My name is Bridgette Wangari Wamakima.“Wangari” in Kikuyu means “of cheetah.” As a child, I didn’t always embrace my middle name. I moved to America when I was six years...
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Reflecting on My Mom

Reflecting on My Mom
Why is it that when we’re younger some of us find ourselves saying, “I will be nothing like my parents when I get older.” But is it possible to say the person who you are today is a result of who your parents are and the manner in which they brought you up in? Whether...
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Finding a Place of Stability

Finding a Place of Stability
Growing up was full of plenty of instability, as I remember. I was born in New York City, but did not stay there for long. When it wasn’t my parents’ jobs relocating, it was our whole family relocating. I remember moving around from borough to borough in New York City trying to find a place...
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Latina: Kathy’s Story

Latina: Kathy’s Story
I was born in 1993, with both my parents being immigrants.  My dad came before my mom when he was 18 during the 12-year Civil War in El Salvador. At the time, Salvadorians, once entering American territory, were granted residency because of the violent war. My mom came to America crossing the Mexcian border with...
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The Different Family

The Different Family
(Image:My favorite place in the world: Nagaland, India) My name is Christine, I am currently nineteen years old, and I am the child of immigrants. My parents immigrated to America from India a little over twenty years ago. Now, I know that there are many immigrant children, specifically many Indian-American immigrant children, who are born and...
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